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Effective and Realistic Tips to Lose Baby Weight After Pregnancy

By October 26, 2018 No Comments
Effective And Realistic Tips To Lose Baby Weight After Pregnancy
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How Can You Lose Weight After Pregnancy

On average, a woman gains between 25 and 35 pounds during her pregnancy. During and labor and immediately after delivery a new mother might shed 10 to 15 pounds of that. This leaves from 10 to 25 additional pounds of weight left on the new mom’s body. It can be a source of great shock, disappointment, frustration, and despair to a woman to discover that after giving birth she can no longer fit into the clothes she wore prior to the pregnancy.

Losing weight after pregnancy is not a foolish errand, but neither is it an easy errand; it requires patience, a realistic attitude, a positive outlook, and when it comes down to persistence and dedication. A realistic outlook by any means is to expect to lose no more than 1 or 2 pounds per week. For an extra 10 to 25 pounds, then, that can take anywhere from 2 months to 2 years.

There is no quick fix to losing weight after pregnancy that is sustainable and lasting, at least. So the best way to succeed is to start out with realistic expectations for the time frame in which to achieve your results and with the commitment to seeing the process through, however long it may take.

Now that you have the right mental attitude, let’s go over a few suggestions for ways to get rid of that unwanted weight postpartum:

Don’t start right away: Contrary to the “do it now” mentality you are normally advised to live by when you have just given birth, your body needs time to adjust to the changes it is undergone over the preceding 9 months. Remember, you are not returning to the state you were in before your pregnancy; you are in a new state you have never been in before. You are in the body of a new mother, and this body needs time to get used to this new way of being. Avoid weight-loss dieting of any sort for a good three months after delivering. Don’t worry about exercise so much as just being sure you remain active and moving around. You can use your menstrual cycle as an indicator of when your body is ready to take on a more intentional program of diet and exercise; when it normalizes, you are ready to go.

Start slow: Your body is still healing from the pregnancy, and diving headlong into a heavy-duty exercise regimen may be too much of a shock to your newly-adjusting system to do you any good at all. Walking around the block or the park with your baby is an excellent way to begin, and it primes your body exquisitely for taking on more extensive and intensive exercise at a later date.

Set yourself up for success: That means keep your kitchen stocked with fresh and healthy foods, particularly snacks, so when you feel the urge to eat something, you have only suitable options around. Several smaller meals throughout the day will serve your ends far better than just 2 or 3 large meals. And don’t try and starve yourself. You will do no good to your new baby that way, and you will invariably find yourself binging sometime later on to compensate.

Have patience with yourself. The period of time following pregnancy is already exhausting and exasperating enough, on so many levels. Don’t burden yourself further with guilt, shame, and unrealistic expectations.

Shedding excess weight after pregnancy is not an easy task, but it can be done. Everybody is different. Rather than comparing your rate of postpartum weight loss to that of any other new mother, focus on sticking to the slow and steady path to the long-lasting results you crave: a body that glows more than it ever did during or before you got pregnant.

You could be lucky. I was – just once. When my middle daughter was born I actually weighed 10 pounds less than I had when I’d conceived her. That’s not something you can count on, though, and I can tell you that from experience as well. Most women start their lives as a new mom with an extra 8 to 15 pounds that they didn’t have pre-baby.

There’s a very good reason for that. God designed our bodies with nurture in mind. Part of that weight that you put on during pregnancy was meant to nurture your baby AFTER birth. While your body requires an extra 300 calories a day to keep up with the nutritional demands of your baby during pregnancy, a breastfeeding mother requires at least 500 extra calories a day to produce enough milk and remain healthy. Your body stores up a little extra nutrition for after the birth just in case there isn’t enough food for its needs when it’s time to feed the new little critter.

If you’re breastfeeding, that’s part of the good news. You’ll automatically be burning an extra five hundred calories a day – which will make it considerably easier for you to lose the extra weight. In fact, you may not need to do anything special at all to lose weight. Just focus on eating a normal, healthy, well-balanced diet. If you’re not breastfeeding, you won’t find it quite as easy. Your focus should still be on healthy eating, with moderate exercise to burn extra calories.

Here’s more good news for new mothers. Exercising is easier. Actually, that’s not quite right. Burning more calories is easier. Walking alone for an hour burns 200 calories. Walking while pushing stroller ups that figure considerably. Push a stroller uphill, and it’s even higher. You’ll get extra duty out of things you never thought of like lifting the stroller and car seat in and out of the car, carrying the baby up and down stairs and just plain carrying the baby.

Still, If you find yourself with stubborn pounds that simply won’t come off, exercise and a moderate reduction in calories is the way to go. Just like pregnancy isn’t the time for weight loss, just after pregnancy isn’t the time to stress your body further with severe dietary restrictions. Aim for losing about a pound a week, though chances are you’ll find it coming off faster than that. Being a mom is a high-energy proposition!

Pregnancy Fitness After The Baby Is Born

What happened to that pre-pregnancy body you once had? After nine months of your body going through numerous changes, many of which you do not like or enjoy, your newborn is here and its time to lose the excess weight you have most likely gained. You can speed the process of regaining your pre-pregnancy shape by exercising regularly.

While it may not help eliminate any stretch marks you may have, exercise will help you regain the body you had prior to becoming pregnant. Some of the most common questions asked by new moms are: How soon can one begin postpartum exercises? How long will it take to regain my pre-pregnancy shape? And what are the best exercises to help me achieve my goals? Keep in mind one of the most critical factors that help determine the answers to these questions is how healthy you were during your pregnancy – both physically and mentally.

Have you ever wondered how celebrity moms lose their baby weight so rapidly? One of the most common reasons is because they exercise strenuously prior to and during their pregnancy. Celebrities have been known to lose up to 60 pounds in what seemed like a few days. However, please keep in mind that this is not considered as the normal time frame. These individuals are also quite careful (almost to the point of obsession) about the types of foods they eat. They are also quite able to afford personal trainers and nannies so that they can perform their exercise routines 5-7 days a week for many hours at a time.

Because most new moms have the regular everyday tasks to contend with such as work, errands, families, losing that excess weight after childbirth is not quite so easy. Hopefully, you found the time and the desire to engage in some kind of exercise during your pregnancy, even on the days you just wanted to simply crawl back in bed. If you did, you will find that the process of losing that extra baby weight will be a lot easier for you than for new moms who did no exercise at all while pregnant. Exercising regularly during your pregnancy will have given you the opportunity to become familiar with what will motivate you, give you the best results, and identify the types of exercise that you find the most enjoyable.

Walking, jogging, aerobics, yoga, and many other types of exercise will allow you to lose the extra weight more quickly and you will feel better at the end of each day. Having a new baby can be an exhausting task and the simple act of exercising regularly will undoubtedly increase your energy and stamina when you need it most. Most doctors will say that it is safe to start a post-pregnancy exercise routine six weeks after the birth of your child. Walking and swimming can be started shortly after your baby is born if you do so in moderate amounts at a slow pace. Work up slowly to the more strenuous exercises to ensure your safety and reduce the risks of any complications that could arise from over-exerting yourself before your body has had adequate time to recover.

Weight loss following pregnancy and hanging up the tent-sized maternity clothes is something all new mothers look forward to with anticipation. For most women, but for others, the baby fat is a bit more difficult to shed.  Each woman is different and there is no one size fits all formula for shedding the weight gained during pregnancy.  However, there are a few weight loss guidelines to follow that will have the new Mom back feeling great and wearing her jeans once she gets her strength back.

How much weight did you gain during pregnancy?

The 25 pounds the average woman gains during a pregnancy are spread out more or less like this:

-Baby-8 pounds

-Placenta-1.5 pounds

-Amniotic fluid-2 pounds

-Breasts-2 pounds

-Uterus-2.5 pounds

-Fat, blood volume and water retention

If you were already a little overweight when you first became pregnant, remember that the numbers on your scale kept going to go up almost every time you stepped on it. Fasting or Weight-loss fasting diets following pregnancy are absolutely not a good idea.

A Latino tradition following pregnancy

One of the best Latino traditions during the time right after childbirth is cuarentena, or the quarantine. The mother will spend forty days resting with the newborn after delivery and only worry about taking care of the baby.  The new mother doesnít even consider weight loss issues during this time. Other members of the family will keep house and watch over the other children. While this may not be practical for most new mothers of today, if you do have relatives who live nearby, it would be a good idea to follow some version of this tradition. You’ll feel like a new woman after those forty days of recuperation (or even twenty).

A nutritious diet is more important than weight loss for the first six weeks.

Pregnancy is a magical and mysterious time of life and many women worry about how to achieve weight loss after they give birth. During the first six weeks of postpartum, a healthy diet is much more important than a weight-loss diet. Continue to eat a balance of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein, calcium, and iron. Whether or not you’re breastfeeding, your body is still recovering from the pregnancy and birth, and a nutritionally balanced diet will help you heal and feel better much faster.

Your care provider or doctor may recommend that you take an iron supplement for the first six weeks postpartum, while your body recovers. If you’re breastfeeding, it’s even more important to eat a well-balanced diet, since you’re still sharing all the calories you’re consuming. If you count calories, a breastfeeding woman should consume the same amount as she did before pregnancy to maintain her weight plus about 500 calories. For many, this means about 2,500 to 2,700 calories a day, which will support milk production and allow for moderate weight loss of half a pound per week.

Continue to avoid fish that are high in methylmercury in your weight loss plan.  Other foods, such as sushi, raw milk products, and deli meats, are less risky these days, but you should still take reasonable precautions to avoid food-borne illnesses. Precautions include cooking meat and poultry all the way through, washing all cooking utensils thoroughly, washing all fruits and vegetables thoroughly, and only eating raw foods like sushi from a dependable source.

Healthy weight loss

Other than feeling good and having more energy, there are many motivators for systematically striving for weight loss following pregnancy. If you carry extra pounds, you have an increased risk of diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.  Losing weight will improve your health not only now but it can also influence your weight in future years to come. Studies have shown that women who breastfed beyond 12 weeks and participated in the postpartum aerobic exercise had lower weight gain 15 years later. Excess pregnancy weight gain and failure to lose weight in an appreciable time are indicators of obesity in midlife. Weight loss following pregnancy involves three things: Nutrition, exercise, and scores of patients.  It’s generally difficult to lose weight without exercise being part of your weight loss program.

If you’re breastfeeding, a good bit of the pregnancy weight will come off fairly quickly. But this isn’t a time to try to lose weight. Whether or not you’re breastfeeding, your body won’t recover as well or as quickly if you cut back drastically on your portions or calorie intake. If you ate a lot of sweets or treats during your pregnancy, you can start to cut back on those. But otherwise, there’s no need to add the extra pressure of dieting to an already stressful period of taking care of a newborn baby.

Cautions of exercise

The six-week postpartum visit is a simple check-in with your caregiver or doctor. You’ll be weighed, have your blood pressure taken, and you’ll be asked about any problems. You will probably be given the green light on exercise.

Most caregivers recommend waiting until the six-week postpartum checkup before starting vigorous exercise, but that’s a somewhat arbitrary time frame, based on the typical model of obstetric care.  If your stitches seem to be healed, and if you want to be more active. Moderate exercise before the six-week postpartum visit shouldn’t be a problem

Listen to your body.  Don’t push yourself hard.  Start out slowly, and if you find you are tired or uncomfortable, take your activity level down a notch.  There is no reason to rush the healing process.  There will always be time to exercise and address weight loss.

If you suffer from obesity, your doctor will tell you what kind of diet and exercise you should follow following the childbirth for weight loss.

Eating for one

When you were pregnant, you may have eaten more than usual to support your baby’s growth and development. Proper nutrition is still important after the baby is born – especially if you’re breastfeeding – but your needs and goals are different now. Making wise choices can promote healthy weight loss after pregnancy.   Focus on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Foods high in fiber – such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. These foods provide you with many important nutrients while helping you feel full longer. Other nutrient-rich choices include low-fat dairy products, such as skim milk, yogurt, and low-fat cheeses. White meat poultry, most fish, beans, and lean cuts of beef and pork are good sources of protein, as well as zinc, iron and B vitamins.  These foods will help in your weight loss program.

  1. Avoid Temptation- Buy healthy foods at the grocery store and donít keep junk food in the house.
  2. Eat smaller portions – Don’t try starving yourself or skipping meals. Just cut back on the portions.
  3. Eat only when you are hungry – Distract yourself with an activity if you are constantly hungry.
  4. Drink water before meals.

Beginning exercise

It’s a good idea to start taking short, easy walks as soon as it feels comfortable for you.  If weather permits, simply load up the baby in the stroller and take brisk walks to the park, library, neighborhood coffee shop or anywhere that makes the exercise walk enjoyable.  If you have a reliable babysitter, joining a local gym would be an excellent idea.

The most important factors in weight loss after pregnancy will be patience and consistency, along with a sensible, healthy diet and an exercise plan.  It generally takes about 6-12 months to achieve the total weight loss following pregnancy.

Weight Loss After Pregnancy – What They Didn’t Tell You!

Sarah is a pregnant mother of three who continues to breastfeed her 18-month-old. After each of her pregnancies, she has had difficulty losing weight.

With all of her responsibilities, weight loss isn’t a priority. Still, she wishes that, once this pregnancy is over, she will be able to return to her pre-marriage weight.

The average woman gains more than 25 pounds during her pregnancy. The procedure of childbirth may result in a weight loss of up to 14 pounds, which means that new moms still have considerable weight to lose once they leave the hospital.

However, some women simply assume that this baby fat will never go away. Yet, it is entirely possible to lose weight during the post-partum period. A number of medical experts recommend easing into a weight loss program after the birth of your baby.

This means that you will not start dieting until about three months following birth. You should combine a low-fat diet with moderate exercise in order to achieve weight loss.

Don’t expect instant results. It will take you up to a good nine months to get back to your weight prior to pregnancy. A go-slow approach is best because you need to give your body time to recover after childbirth.

Certainly, you might be able to lose weight faster, but you might be sacrificing valuable nutrients as a result.

Interestingly enough, breastfeeding actually enhances weight loss. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has found that breastfeeding leads to the release of hormones which enable your uterus to return to its normal size.

However, breastfeeding alone wonít bring down your weight. You need to combine it with a sensible diet and a moderate exercise program. Keep in mind that you need to have at least 1800 calories a day while breastfeeding in order to keep yourself and your baby healthy.

Still, stay clear of junk food during this period. You should rely on food with high nutritional value to maintain the proper level of calories each day.

There are many good reasons to exercise during the post-partum period. In addition to helping to accelerate weight reduction, exercise can help alleviate post-partum depression, improve your mood, and boost your confidence. Exercise can also ìclear your headî so that youíre better able to meet the demands of motherhood.

You might consider joining a “Mommy and Me” exercise class so that your baby can exercise right along with you. Another helpful hint is to enlist the help of a friend or relative to act as your exercise buddy so that youíll have some emotional support while exercising.

An added bonus of exercise is that it should boost your energy level, which is quite important when battling the fatigue which comes from caring for a newborn.

Your diet should generally be low-fat but not fat-free; vitamin-rich, and high-fiber. Under no circumstances should you go on a fad diet. Such a diet could be quite harmful to your health and could actually slow your recovery from childbirth. It’s a good idea to set weight-loss goals, but don’t go overboard. Recognize that thereís a limit to the amount of weight you can lose during a given period of time.

You may see a number of actress-moms gracing the covers of magazines shortly after the birth of their children. They appear svelte and elegant, totally devoid of baby fat.

In the accompanying article, they may even talk about exercising right after childbirth. Such articles send new mothers a dangerous message: that you must do all you can to become thin as quickly as possible after your baby is born.

Such a philosophy is not only ridiculous, but it’s also unhealthy. As a result, you will need to tune out such messages from the media and stay the course with your own gradual weight loss plan.

The time right after the birth of a child can be quite challenging, taxing both your physical and emotional strength. While it is certainly a good idea to eat healthy, youíll need to pace yourself as far as weight loss is concerned.

Over time, you should be able to lose the weight you gained during your pregnancy. In fact, you might find that youíre actually healthier after your baby is born.

Evelyn Robinson

Evelyn Robinson

Evelyn Robinson is a health educator and author. She is an inherent activist, empowering people around reproductive health and guiding thousands of people in their transition from pregnancy to parenthood.

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